UW Graduate School

Joseph Hill

Joseph HillWalker Ames Lecturer

  • Assistant Professor in the Department of American Sign Language and Interpreting Education at the National Technical Institutes for the Deaf (NTID)

March 13, 2019  |   7:30 p.m.
Kane Hall, room 120

  • Registration will open Monday, December 10 
  • This event is free and open to the public. 
  • The lecture will be given in American Sign Language. Spoken English interpretation will be provided.

Emerging Trends in the Study of Black ASL: History, Structure, and People

Dr. Joseph C. Hill gives a comprehensive overview of the studies on the emergence, maintenance, and structure of Black ASL from 1960s to present. The historical and linguistic changes in Black ASL align with the U.S. educational, political, and cultural landscapes which are identified as the sociolinguistic and geographical factors in the formation of Black ASL. As the recognizable part of the linguistic structure of Black ASL, phonology, morphology, and discourse are the features that make it a distinct variety of ASL based on the publications in 1970s and 2010s. Dr. Hill concludes with the future directions in the study of Black ASL that continues to evolve over time with the ever shifting culture and ideology.

About Joseph Hill

Dr. Joseph C. Hill is Assistant Professor in the Department of American Sign Language and Interpreting Education at the National Technical Institutes for the Deaf (NTID). NTID is part of the Rochester Institute of Technology campus in Rochester, New York. His main research interests are socio-linguistic and historical aspects of African-American variety of American Sign Language (ASL), namely Black ASL, and language attitudes and ideologies in the American Deaf community. Dr. Hill, a 2004 recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Student Fellowship and a 2008 recipient of the Fulbright Program, is one of the co-authors who have published a Gallaudet University Press’s 2011 volume on the Black ASL, The Hidden Treasure of Black ASL: Its History and Structure, that explores the history and language of the African-American Deaf community in the southern U.S. states and describes the linguistic structure of Black ASL. He also published another 2012 volume, Language Attitudes in the American Deaf Community, with the analysis of linguistic and social factors in language judgments and perception about signing variation in the American Deaf community.

Sponsoring Departments

  • UW Graduate School
  • Department of Linguistics
  • Department of English
  • Department of Communications
  • Department of Anthropology